Tech in the 603, The Granite State Hacker

Time to Remodel the Kitchen?

A few good reasons to consider keeping your IT infrastructure up to snuff…

http://edgewatertech.wordpress.com/2012/08/21/time-to-remodel-the-kitchen/

(I’m honored to have the post accepted & published on Edgewater’s blog.)  🙂 

Tech in the 603, The Granite State Hacker

Infrastructure Agility via Cloud Technology

I’m honored to have just been published on Edgewater’s public blog…

It’s bit about managing infrastructure agility. The basic idea is architecting your infrastructure so that you can push off parts to different clouds when you need to, for any of a multitude of reasons. The idea goes a bit beyond virtualization.

Check it out:

http://edgewatertech.wordpress.com/2009/04/24/best-practice-cloud-computing/

Tech in the 603, The Granite State Hacker

Champions of Disruption

I’ve been noticing lately that truely interesting things only happen on the “edge”. Everything is energy, and everything happens at the point where energy flows are disrupted.

If you don’t believe me, just ask Mother Nature. Take solar energy. Powerful energy flows from our sun and saturates our solar system… but all the amazing things happen where that energy flow is disrupted. The Earth disrupts it, and the result, in this case, is merely life as we know it.

It’s so primal that we’ve abstracted the concept of energy flows, and call it (among other things) currency. When we sell a resource (a form of energy, in a sense), we even call that change “liquidation”.

Sure, potential energy has value, but there are no edges in a region of potential energy. Potential energy is usually static, consistent, and only really exciting for what it could do or become, rather than what it currently is.

Likewise, it’s where disruptions occur that there’s business to be done.

According to this article on Information Week, CIO/CTO’s appear to have generally become change-averse order takers. Surveys cited indicate that many shops are not actively engaged in strategy or business process innovation.

Perhaps they’re still feeling whipped by the whole “IT / Business Alignment” malignment. Maybe they’re afraid of having business process innovation through technology innovation come off as an attempt to drive the business. Ultimately, it seems many are going into survival mode, setting opportunity for change asside in favor of simply maintaining the business.

Maybe the real challenge for IT is to help business figure out that innovation is change, and change is where the action is.

In any case, it seems there’s a lot of potential energy building up out there.

The disruptions must come. Will you be a witness, a victim, or a champion of them?

Tech in the 603, The Granite State Hacker

Retail IT in the Enterprise

Lately, the projects I’ve been on have had me taking on roles outside my comfort zone. (I’m not talking about downtown-Boston… with the “Boston Express” out of Nashua, I’m ok with that.)

I’ve always been most comfortable, myself, in cross-discipline engineering roles, especially in smaller teams where everyone’s got good cross-discipline experience. The communications overhead is low. The integration friction is low. Everyone knows how it needs to be done, and people are busy building rather than negotiating aggressively.

These types of tight, focused teams have always had business focused folks who took on the role of principal consultant. In this type of situation, the principal consultant provides an insulation boundary between the technical team and the customer.

This insulation has made me comfortable in that “zone”: I’m a technologist. I eat, sleep, dream software development. I take the ability to communicate complex technical concepts with my peers effectively and concisely, very seriously.

So like I said, lately the projects I’ve been on have yanked me pretty hard out of that zone. I’ve been called on to communicate directly with my customers. I’ve been handling item-level projects, and it’s a different world. There is no insulation. I’m filling all my technical roles, plus doing light BA and even PM duty.

Somewhat recently, I emailed a solution description to a CFO. The response: “Send this again in user-level English.”

It killed me.

I’ve gotten so used to having others “protect” me from this sort of non-technical blunder. In contemporary projects, the insulating consulting roles are simply not present.

Makes me wonder about the most important lessons I learned during my school days… In high school days, maybe it was retail courtesy, and retail salesmanship in a technical atmosphere (“Radio Shack 101”). In college days, the key lessons might have been how to courteously negotiate customer experience levels, (from “help desk 101”).